Generating Page-Turning Momentum—Characters & The Wound

Kristen, I love your post.  I was stuck on the first picture for about five minutes trying to figure out how in the world that happened.  Would be great to hear the one sentence story on that. 🙂

As for the character wounds, I have to agree.  A fictional story can be bland without a problem and good reasoning for the problem.  Thanks for sharing the insight.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Screen Shot 2012-12-20 at 10.17.54 AM Hmmm, what’s the story behind THIS?

Can we answer the question, “What is your book about?” in one sentence. Is our answer clear and concise? Does it paint a vivid picture of something others would want to part with time and money to read? Plot is important, but a major component of a knockout log-line is casting the right characters.

Due to popular demand I am running my Your Story in a Sentenceclass in about two weeks and participants have their log lines shredded and rebuilt and made agent-ready. Log-lines are crucial because if we don’t know what our book is about? How are we going to finish it? Revise it? Pitch it? Sell it?

Once we have an idea of what our story is about and have set the stage for the dramatic events that will unfold, we must remember that fiction is about PROBLEMS. Plain and simple…

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