What to do When Your Plot Hits a Wall: Part 1

Interesting POV on getting unstuck.  This strategy will come in handy if I can’t figure out where to go with a story.

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Pau Helps: Writing Characters’ Thoughts

Great writing tips from Stephanie Morrill on expressing character thoughts in a story.  Also Pau’s picks on other helpful sites.

Writing Tips from Jodie Renner

I love Jodie’s advice.  Especially items 1 and 2 about staying in character and out of your own head when writing.  When I look back at some of the things I’ve written here, I can clearly see the difference between times when I felt, thought and experienced the story as the character as opposed to just writing about what I thought the character would feel or think.

She also has good points on pepping up story dialogue.

Writing Tip: “Sense” Your Scenes

I have to agree with this post in so many ways.  Just because colorful words are used, they may not be structured or written in a way that helps the reader get a good feel for the scene or even the character.  This can leave an otherwise great story, limp and lifeless – like Ben Stein’s character from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off.

What I appreciate from this post are the questions and insight provided to help writers create more sensory scenes – the type that engage reader’s 5 senses and can provoke thoughts.  I’ve always loved books and movies that could do this.

Image: Five Senses – Tomesia Ingram

Stephanie Huesler

I try to read a book a week; it’s usually on a Saturday, when I have time to sit down and read a good chunk at a time.  This past weekend I read a book which prompted thoughts around this concept of “sensing” a scene, and reading it aloud to hear any howlers that might have crept into the writing.  The author of that book obviously did neither, though her editor might have told her to beef up descriptives – so they were clumped all together, staggering me as a reader to a halt while I tried to figure out the context of the pages of descriptives before remembering what the characters were doing there in the first place, and often the dialogue sounded very stilted (e.g. using “vocalized” instead of “shouted” – the latter of the two would have fit into the character’s time and place far better) – a…

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Show and Tell… Or Not…

I really like this individual’s insight on writing. I have found that I sometimes feel the need to tell everything about the character’s background early on. After reading this post, I will do better with the “dangling carrot” method to keep readers enthused and engaged.