Defeating Writer’s Block 3: Do Not Edit

Wonderful insight for the perfectionist in us.

Broken Mirrors

I’m on this topic as I face a writer’s temptation, and to succumb to these snares sends one to the purgatory of a special kind of writer’s block. I write at a speed of approximately one chapter a night. Sometimes it’s more, often it’s less, but at a point I run into a wall and can’t move forward. At this point I take pleasure in the finer things in life, since I’ve already cleaned the house as an excuse not to write.

When I get closer to finishing, I do not appreciate this open space. I want to write all the time, dedicating every waking minute not at work to my literary pursuits, so there is now the temptation to edit. I want to print it out and start editing and fixing plot holes once I hit that wall of productive writing.

Often times, people don’t get this far without editing…

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The Editoral Process

Good tips

kelly sumner

The editorial process in publishing is a lot of hard work. This article discusses the ins and outs of this stage of publishing.

As a writer, you care deeply about your words and you’ve tried to get them just right. Hence your first encounter with an editor might be a little daunting. When they send you pages and pages of notes for revisions, you might be overwhelmed, depressed, and demoralized. Take heart… this is normal!

I recommend you enter the editorial process with a humble and teachable spirit. The editing process is a terrific opportunity to learn how to improve your writing. Click here to learn more.

Kelly

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Five Warning Signs Your Story Needs Revision

Good tips!

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Screen Shot 2013-03-22 at 11.38.45 AM Original image via Jenny Downing Flikr Creative Commons

We can have the best story ideas in the world, but to be blunt? There’s a lot to be said for delivery. While these problems might seem picky, there are some fundamental errors that can weaken the writing. If our writing loses power, this can become distressing or distracting to readers.

Many readers (not being editors or professional writers) might not be able to articulate specifically why they lost interest in a story, but often the answer is simple. It can be an accumulation of the small things. The little foxes spoil the vine.

Most of us make one or more of these errors, especially when we’re new. Hey, that’s called “being NEW.” No one is born with the natural ability to write brilliant, perfect novels coded into their DNA. It takes time and practice, so give yourself permission to make…

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This is how it feels to be edited — and why it’s still essential

When I think of editing, the first thing that comes to mind is the days of old when school teachers marked incorrect answers with a red pen. Back then it felt like failure or stupidity, but after reading this post it sheds new light. Whether the markings are red, blue, or something else, having someone to review your work and make suggestions can be the difference between a masterpiece or a master mess.

Broadside

By Caitlin Kelly

OK, let’ s stipulate that it’s not always fun.revision1

OK, sometimes it’s really horrible.

Some people dread it. Some people fear it. Some people avoid the whole thing, by self-publishing or never submitting their ideas or work to an editor for their professional judgment.

But without an editor, your writing is stuck in neutral forever.

Even if they’re a butcher who adds errors to your copy (yes, that happens) or inserts words you’d never use (that, too) or asks asinine questions (hell, yes), you’re still learning how to write better as a result.

Few things can so quickly clarify your original intent more than having every word challenged.

Journalism, and commercial publishing, is a team sport. No matter what medium, that isn’t about to change.

Nor should it.

This delicious joke, how a women’s magazine editor would edit a BBC report was amusing every writer I know…

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Getting Good Critiques pt 1

This was a nice post on the difference between a critique and a review. I also liked the idea of giving suggestions for the feedback.

The Well-Rounded Writer

One of the most useful things we can get as a writer is a good critique. It helps us grow by showing us how we can perfect our craft. On the other hand, a bad critique can leave us feeling frustrated and angry. So what can you do as a writer in order to ensure that you get an insightful and helpful critique? Obviously (or at least I hope it’s obvious), you start with good writing. Good writing may get a bad critiques sometimes, but bad writing will get bad critiques all the time (except usually from family and maybe some friends).

Before I get into the nitty-gritty of getting good critiques, I should take a moment to specify what I consider the difference between a critique and a review. While researching this article, I found several websites that used the terms interchangeably, and I don’t want to confuse anyone…

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