#Editing??? I Don’t Need No Stinking Editing

Gotta love the double negatives in the title.  Especially in reference to the header image. 🙂

I for one, need editing. Without it how good could a work be? Unless, we’re like the guy from the Limitless movie, writers need editing and editors.

Grammatical errors, plot holes, and the like can turn off a reader. It’s like getting your mouth set for the popsicle in the freezer only to find your spouse ate it already. I don’t know of anyone who gets excited about Continue reading “#Editing??? I Don’t Need No Stinking Editing”

#Editing??? I Don’t Need No Stinking Editing

morguefile

Gotta love the double negatives in the title.  Especially in reference to the header image. 🙂

I for one, need editing. Without it how good could a work be? Unless, we’re like the guy from the Limitless movie, writers need editing and editors.

Grammatical errors, plot holes, and the like can turn off a reader. It’s like getting your mouth set for the popsicle in the freezer only to find your spouse ate it already. I don’t know of anyone who gets excited about reading something full of errors or a plot that’s confusing or has gaps.

The Writer’s Digest has some great advice on editing. Things like taking a break between the first and second draft to refresh, asking the right questions after a read-through, and enlisting the help of beta readers or editors can make the difference between a good story and a great book.

Check out the link above for more insight.

Tuesday Two-Minute Writing Tip – Don’t Just Begin and Start

I must admit, I’m guilty of adding the words “beginning to” or “starting to” in my works.  I don’t think I knew or realized the impact until reading this post.  Thanks Alicia!

Author Alicia Dean

Got two minutes? Then check out this week’s quick tip:

booksh

Phrases like ‘began to’ and ‘started to’ show up in manuscripts more frequently than you might expect. When you really think about it, though, they do not quite work for what you’re trying to convey. Plus, they are weak and inactive. Examples: 

He started running.

He began coughing.

He placed his hand on the door and began to open it.

Her legs started to tremble.

Her heart began to race.

She started to laugh.

When I see wording like this, I have to ask myself, these questions, and I’ll admit, some strange images appear in my mind.

Did he start running but only take a few steps and pause mid-air? Did he hack out half a cough? How do you ‘begin to open’ a door? Did he turn the knob or pull on the door but not really open it? Did her legs give a few…

View original post 440 more words