Don Draper’s Guide to Fantastic Writing

When it comes to successful creativity and slogans that might-have-been, look no further than AMC’s Mad Men.  During it’s original run from 2007-2015, I missed out on the thought-provoking, artisty, dry wit, and shenanigans of the fictional advertising staff of Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce.  But I’m lucky!  I’m able to catch the reruns.

It’s interesting to watch Don’s take on an idea, sometimes stumbling upon a great ad campaign along the way.  For example SnoBall.  He took the concept of “a snowball’s chance in hell” and turned it into something consumers would find humorous and memorable.  Now that’s good writing!

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Learn to #Write by Watching #Television

Watching TV is one of my favorite pastimes behind sleep, writing, and reading. When I do vegetate in front of the boob tube, I take in more than the plot. I take into account whether my attention is drawn and what/how that is done, the setting, how the characters illustrate their lines, etc.  In addition, I consider the topic or subject matter and its relevance to me and society at large.  With all this information and detail, I use it to help me gauge whether my writing content is competitive, stirring a new direction, or needs to be reworked.

Does anyone else use this type of method for their writing? Does television influence your storylines? Continue reading ->

Learn to Write by Watching Television

Watching TV is one of my favorite pastimes behind sleep, writing, and reading. When I do vegetate in front of the boob tube, I take in more than the plot. I take into account whether my attention is drawn and what/how that is done, the setting, how the characters illustrate their lines, etc.  In addition, I consider the topic or subject matter and its relevance to me and society at large.  With all this information and detail, I use it to help me gauge whether my writing content is competitive, stirring a new direction, or needs to be reworked.

Does anyone else use this type of method for their writing? Does television influence your storylines? Read More>

TV & Movies Versus Literature

It’s so wonderful to know that the future and options for writers is limitless….well, as long as our imagination can still wander. 🙂

Elle Writes Fiction

TV & movies are just as important to being a good writer as literature. There I said it. Let the gods of writing come down and smite me, but I honestly believe this fact. As a writing major in a tiny liberal arts college, my Alma Mater didn’t offer as many fiction classes as I would have liked. To get my credits in, I branched into the communications department. I did scriptwriting, screenplays, plays, television writing; you name it, I’ve done it and I loved it.

Writers are not banished to a world of fiction or poetry, nonfiction or journalism. Writers and writing majors can do anything! (Yes, I’m still mostly unemployed but hear me out). Commercials, websites for businesses, television shows, movies, infomercials, reviews all of these had to be written. No, they’re not all glamorous but you can literally do anything with this degree. (My problem is my…

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Books versus Movies/TV – Who Did it Best?

Image: Organized Clutter
Image: My Clutter Box

I love to watch movies and television.  And sometimes I watch something and then find out later that it began as a book.  There have been occasions where the story was so good that it prompted me to go out and get the book.  One such storyline comes from the television show Resurrection It is based on the book The Returned by Jason Mott.

I won’t go into much detail to keep from spoiling the show or the book for others.  But I will say that the show’s storyline kept me wondering about all the bits and pieces that the book may have went into more detail.  What I found out was that the first few episodes of the show pretty much followed the book.  Where they differ is that the book gave more insight to a lot more characters and locations whereas the show focused on one area and a set of main characters that are interconnected in one way or another.  If I had to choose who did it best, I’d have to go for the show.

Another movie that I have seen and have yet to read the book is Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn.  As the story unfolded, I felt a range of emotions like anticipation, sympathy, disgust, but the biggest was anger towards the main female character.  Because of how the movie drew me in and held my attention, like the paragraph before, it makes me want to read the book.  Once I do that, we’ll see who did it best – book or movie.

And for this year there are more movies coming down the pipeline that are adaptations of books. Here are 21 Books To Read Before They Hit The Big Screen In 2015.

How do you feel about books that are turned into movies or television shows?  Do they meet your expectations or dash them?  Will you go see something on the list for 2015, just read the book, or both?

Learn To Write by Watching Television

Watching TV is one of my favorite pastimes behind sleep, writing, and reading. When I do vegetate in front of the boob tube, I take in more than the plot. I take into account whether my attention is drawn and what/how that is done, the setting, how the characters illustrate their lines, etc.  In addition, I consider the topic or subject matter and its relevance to me and society at large.  With all this information and detail, I use it to help me gauge whether my writing content is competitive, stirring a new direction, or needs to be reworked.

Does anyone else use this type of method for their writing? Does television influence your storylines?

Scribblings

If you had asked me ten years ago if I watched and followed any television shows I would have said ‘no’ and it would have been the truth.   I couldn’t be bothered to watch  anything on the small screen when I could catch up with friends, read a good book and browse the web.  Today of course I’m singing a different tune from a comfy corner on the couch.  I am something of a junkie albeit a Netflix ‘binge’ watcher and I probably should feel some shame for watching so much television and here’s why:

I should be writing in my so-called spare time. I have a story to edit (yay I completed the 1st draft of my story set in Downtown Vancouver) and fifteen more chapters (or so) to write for my WIP.

But I’m not embarrassed because watching the below shows has actually improved my storytelling skills…

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