Typos and Errors in Indie-Published Manuscripts

Typos and errors can happen to the best of us. It’s understandable. The problem I have is when there are so many errors and typos that it’s hard to read. I’ve put down a couple of books for this very reason.

Nina Soden

I originally published this article as a guest author at http://timothy-oullette.blogspot.com/ and http://www.timouellette.com on August 8, 2014, but I felt that the information was important enough that I wanted it in my blog feed as well. I hope you enjoy my take on Typos and Errors in Indie-Published Manuscripts. You can let me know what you think by leaving a comment below.

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Are typos in a book a big deal?

Of course they are – to some extent! Typos happen. Typos happen in books that are self-published and traditionally published. Typos happen to new authors and seasoned authors. Typos happen in eBooks and print books. It doesn’t matter how many people you have edit, proof read, re-read, etc. there is always a chance a typo (or two – or three – or four) is going to slip through. Does that mean the world is over, the author should never write again, or that the…

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My Gift To You: Signatory Agent List For Writers

Robust list of agents and tips on how to contact.

The Krystol Method

My Gift to you painted in a red bow! 

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I know that this blog is very long, but I hope that it will help writers. I am ALL for helping any writer. As someone who is seeking an agent, I know others will benefit, too. This was given to me by another writer and I am passing it on. I hope that someone’s agent is in this list! Good luck and best of all, keep writing! This is the list for the EAST COAST!

 Signatory Agency List 

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250 Hudson Street, New York, NY 10013, (212) 767-7837

Before sending a completed script: We suggest that the individual first write or telephone the agency, detail your professional and/or academic credentials and briefly describe the nature of the material you desire to submit. The agency will then advise the individual whether it is interested in receiving the material with a view…

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How to Start Your Novel

Good information

Writers In The Storm Blog

By Chuck Sambuchino

medium_2429133381One of the most common reasons why agents and editors stop reading sample pages is simply that the story starts too slow. Gone are the days when a book could “get good on page 12.” We also can no longer compare our writing to classic works or even books written 30 years ago that started slow and found marketplace success.

Today’s novels — especially debut novels — must grab readers from the first page, the first paragraph, even the first sentence.

Despite the fact that the importance of starting strong appears to be well known by most aspiring writers, people still have a hard time with it.

I was freelance editing a client’s first 15 pages last year and was dismayed to see that all 15 pages simply described a mystical woman walking across the desert heading for task at a faraway location. There was no…

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Writing from a Photo Prompt

I’m finding that photos and images can provide a Good opening for creativity. When dealing with writer’s block it can be the spark to at least brainstorm a thought or feeling. And as the blogger mentioned, it could lead to questions which can help in writing about the answer.

Penguin Ponderings

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I took this photo the last time I went to Africa. I played around with it a bit and changed it to black and white. I was hoping it would inspire me to come up with a little story about it, perhaps a witty caption. I’m still searching for a story for this photo to tell.

I’ve often read in writing magazines and online that a good way to start writing again, to beat blocks or boredom, is to use a photo prompt. Granted, most of the prompts you see are a little more advanced than this one. What I mean is, they have much more going on.

I like the idea of taking a photo and trying to come up with a story behind it. It doesn’t have to be elaborate or mind-blowing. But I like that it gets the creative and imaginative juices swirling. Well, it should. Currently…

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Defeating Writer’s Block 3: Do Not Edit

Wonderful insight for the perfectionist in us.

Broken Mirrors

I’m on this topic as I face a writer’s temptation, and to succumb to these snares sends one to the purgatory of a special kind of writer’s block. I write at a speed of approximately one chapter a night. Sometimes it’s more, often it’s less, but at a point I run into a wall and can’t move forward. At this point I take pleasure in the finer things in life, since I’ve already cleaned the house as an excuse not to write.

When I get closer to finishing, I do not appreciate this open space. I want to write all the time, dedicating every waking minute not at work to my literary pursuits, so there is now the temptation to edit. I want to print it out and start editing and fixing plot holes once I hit that wall of productive writing.

Often times, people don’t get this far without editing…

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