Need Writing Help?

It’s good to have a helping hand.  That’s why I’m glad there are writers like Renee Bell who offer assistance.  Thought I’d pass along the word.

Renee Bell's Book Reviews

As a writer myself I know it’s hard sometimes to find the right things for your story. Or maybe there’s something you’d like to do but you don’t know how too. We all get stuck sometimes. That’s why I am here! I am offering writing tips to anyone or would like help! Just contact me here with your question or email me at reneebellreviews@yahoo.com and we’ll get started!

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Writing Tips from Jodie Renner

I love Jodie’s advice.  Especially items 1 and 2 about staying in character and out of your own head when writing.  When I look back at some of the things I’ve written here, I can clearly see the difference between times when I felt, thought and experienced the story as the character as opposed to just writing about what I thought the character would feel or think.

She also has good points on pepping up story dialogue.

Writing Helper #4 – “Stephen King’s Top 20 Rules For Writers”

StoryChesire posted a compilation of insightul and helpful rules by author Stephen King.  I love this list because it’s straight to the point without fluff or a sugar-coating. Out of the 2o rules listed, the two that stood out for me were #1 and #10.

I believe it’s human nature to want our work to be great, accepted, and admired.  However, the truth is that some will like what we put out and others will give a simple meh. If we can be happy with our work, shouldn’t that be enough?  Of course, write for the audience, but should that be the major driving force?

When it comes to first drafts and editing, I’ve been causing myself more stress for the sake of meeting a self-made deadline.  I’m working on a first draft of a book now and my goal was to have this done by the end of this month.  Well, guess what?  It’s not going to happen.  Unfortunately, life intervened.  So I really appreciate the wisdom of Mr. King on this one.

Of the 20 rules, which stood out to you?  What would you add to the list?

Defeating Writer’s Block 3: Do Not Edit

Wonderful insight for the perfectionist in us.

Broken Mirrors

I’m on this topic as I face a writer’s temptation, and to succumb to these snares sends one to the purgatory of a special kind of writer’s block. I write at a speed of approximately one chapter a night. Sometimes it’s more, often it’s less, but at a point I run into a wall and can’t move forward. At this point I take pleasure in the finer things in life, since I’ve already cleaned the house as an excuse not to write.

When I get closer to finishing, I do not appreciate this open space. I want to write all the time, dedicating every waking minute not at work to my literary pursuits, so there is now the temptation to edit. I want to print it out and start editing and fixing plot holes once I hit that wall of productive writing.

Often times, people don’t get this far without editing…

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Writer’s Block or Something Else???

bigstock-Woman-thinking-blackboard-conc-39259996

Right now my brain feels as empty as the bubble above the lady’s head in the picture.   Well, maybe my head isn’t empty, per se.  🙂 I’m just having a moment of writer’s block.  I’ll have an idea and begin to write something, but it doesn’t make sense or there’s no where for me to go next.  I thought about just posting a collaboration of my illiterate ramblings, but don’t want to embarrass myself.

I will admit that there is a lot going on right now in my personal life, so it is possible that my brain is just overloaded to where it cannot connect the dots.  So, while I get over this issue of creativity I thought for the month of August I’d post tips about writer’s block from other wonderful authors and bloggers from WordPress.  Enjoy!

 

XOXO, Melanie Dawnn

Photo: faylamb

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This is how it feels to be edited — and why it’s still essential

When I think of editing, the first thing that comes to mind is the days of old when school teachers marked incorrect answers with a red pen. Back then it felt like failure or stupidity, but after reading this post it sheds new light. Whether the markings are red, blue, or something else, having someone to review your work and make suggestions can be the difference between a masterpiece or a master mess.

Broadside

By Caitlin Kelly

OK, let’ s stipulate that it’s not always fun.revision1

OK, sometimes it’s really horrible.

Some people dread it. Some people fear it. Some people avoid the whole thing, by self-publishing or never submitting their ideas or work to an editor for their professional judgment.

But without an editor, your writing is stuck in neutral forever.

Even if they’re a butcher who adds errors to your copy (yes, that happens) or inserts words you’d never use (that, too) or asks asinine questions (hell, yes), you’re still learning how to write better as a result.

Few things can so quickly clarify your original intent more than having every word challenged.

Journalism, and commercial publishing, is a team sport. No matter what medium, that isn’t about to change.

Nor should it.

This delicious joke, how a women’s magazine editor would edit a BBC report was amusing every writer I know…

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