How to not lose your mind while #editing

This is excellent advice!

Bernadette Benda

Editing a novel. How shall I describe it?

Editing is like polishing silver, except with a blindfold, and the blindfold is on fire, and you are banging your head against a wall trying to put the flames out while still polishing the silver.

giphy (28) pretty much how it is

But it’s all worth it. I promise. (I really, really, really promise the editing is worth it).

But how – how do you not lose your mind while editing?? I got a few tips…they may be helpful…

*grins and shrugs*

plant1

Write clear and concise notes.

This probably depends on your editing process…but if you’re like me, you take a lot of notes. A LOT.

As I have mentioned before on this blog, I am notorious for leaving undecipherable notes that make no sense to me or anyone else that Elrond himself would not be able to decipher. Or, I write notes…

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Why #writer’s guilt sucks

I’ve certainly been there. A way to overcome the guilt may be to document it. Write a paragraph about what the guilt feels like…thoughts…etc. That may be good stuff to use when writing a character for a scene, and it’s being productive.

The Wondering Scribe

Hello Peepz,

Have you ever felt bad for not writing? Or, in an opposite mood, felt guilty for wanting to write? Have you disliked yourself for writing a certain thing? I have too, and it sucks.

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11 Steps for #Writing the Perfect Scene

Some tips are so good, they bear repeating…

Melanie V. Logan

Ever have a great scene in your head, but when you write it all down, it seems flat?  I’ve certainly been there.  It can be frustrating to visualize everything, and even come up with a bunch of eloquent words that do absolutely nothing for the story.

A writer can show and tell all they want.  But when a story feels dull, chances are the book will be placed on a shelf or table to collect dust.  I certainly don’t want that.  So I enlisted the trusty assistance of Google to help me figure out how to improve my scene.

Lucky enough, I found

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Facing rejection from Agents: Remember No means No!

Confessions of a published author

I was ready to submit and had researched various literary agency websites. My covering letter, synopsis and manuscript were polished and ready to go. I felt a sense of euphoria when I actually posted that A4 envelope off or clicked ‘send’ on the messages I sent. There was nothing to do but wait for the positive replies to come in!

Unfortunately it didn’t turn out that way. You see rejection may be presented in many different forms, but they all the mean the same thing: No means No!

Let me run you through the different forms of literary rejection. Please note that these are actual replies and not ones I’ve made up.

I can’t be bothered replying to you ‘No’:

This is where the agent doesn’t even bother getting back to you. They may have read your work or may not have. For all you know there is…

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photo: Caro Wallis Sweet Sorrow via photopin (license)

Building Your #Writer’s #Brand – Sound Advice from E. Denise Billups

Writing can be easy…and hard.  The easy part is jotting down all the wonderful story ideas that float in our heads.  The harder part comes with editing and getting the finish product before the masses. Knowing what to do or how to do it can be frustrating.  But with great advice on brand building from fellow writers like E. Denise Billups, how can we ever fail.

E. Denise Billups, Writer

Indie authors are jack-of-all-trades. Not only are they writers, but also promoters and marketers of their finished product. This for most writers is difficult and for some an afterthought. Before you finish your book, you should have a well-defined marketing plan established and the first step is to create a mission statement.

In simple terms, a mission statement is short, concise sentence or paragraph describing your business and purpose (who you are, what you do, and your purpose or goals). This single statement is your marketing message, disseminating your brand, and the writer’s guide to reaching his/her ultimate goals.

Most people believe a mission statement is for major corporations or nonprofit organizations but for anyone building a brand whether you’re a painter, architect or writer, a mission statement is a crucial piece to crafting your image. For indie or traditionally published authors, a mission statement conveys your passion, your expertise, and…

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Short #Story vs. The #Novel

The best things come in big packages, right?  What about the small ones?

When it comes to short story versus novel, the perspective on which is better is best decided by the reader.  Each has its strong points and drawbacks.  However, for a writer, the decision may be based on focus, time, and desire.

For those choosing the shorter route, K. M. Pohlkamp has practical tips on writing a great short story.

K.M. Pohlkamp - Author Website

The obvious difference between a short story and a novel is well, a short story is shorter. That profound statement did not require a degree in rocket science.

And with a shorter word count, short stories must be easier, right?

There is no hard rule, but as a general frame of reference: a short story is between 1,000 to 20,000 words, but most short stories are between 3,000 and 5,000 words. A novel is anything greater than ~55,000 words.

Having just completed a draft of a short story myself, I’d argue a short story takes less time, but not less skill or thought. Short stories simply require a different approach.

In fact, I think the challenge with short stories is the word count. This provides limited space to intrigue the reader, introduce characters, provide concept of their world, and overcome a dilemma.

How can so much be accomplished in…

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Don’t Always Listen to Spell Check

How many times have you typed a word like “melons” but really meant “lemons”?  To the spell checker, both are words.  So what’s wrong?

The problem is that spell check does not read as humans do. Depending on what the sentence is about, the incorrect word could make it confusing.  For example, how many people heard of turning melons into lemonade?  Anybody?  Bueller?

Having someone to proofread is generally a good idea, but even humans miss stuff.  So what’s a writer to do?

Ruminated Scrawlings

Spellcheck has the tendency to lead you astray when you are writing anything on a word processor program such as Microsoft Word. It may tell you to put a comma where a comma doesn’t belong, remind you about how bad you are at spelling because it keeps giving you the wrong word no matter how many times you rewrite the word, and it always asks you to remove a word that is obviously there for effect.

Spell checkers and by extension grammar checkers work on an algorithm which uses grammar rules, and a dictionary which contains all the common words in the English language. The problem is that when you are writing a story you sometimes need to ignore grammar rules or spelling, or you have made up words or words from other languages which the spell checker cannot detect. It’s hard writing fantasy when you see red squiggly lines all over…

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