How to not lose your mind while #editing

This is excellent advice!

Bernadette Benda

Editing a novel. How shall I describe it?

Editing is like polishing silver, except with a blindfold, and the blindfold is on fire, and you are banging your head against a wall trying to put the flames out while still polishing the silver.

giphy (28) pretty much how it is

But it’s all worth it. I promise. (I really, really, really promise the editing is worth it).

But how – how do you not lose your mind while editing?? I got a few tips…they may be helpful…

*grins and shrugs*

plant1

Write clear and concise notes.

This probably depends on your editing process…but if you’re like me, you take a lot of notes. A LOT.

As I have mentioned before on this blog, I am notorious for leaving undecipherable notes that make no sense to me or anyone else that Elrond himself would not be able to decipher. Or, I write notes…

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Why #writer’s guilt sucks

I’ve certainly been there. A way to overcome the guilt may be to document it. Write a paragraph about what the guilt feels like…thoughts…etc. That may be good stuff to use when writing a character for a scene, and it’s being productive.

The Wondering Scribe

Hello Peepz,

Have you ever felt bad for not writing? Or, in an opposite mood, felt guilty for wanting to write? Have you disliked yourself for writing a certain thing? I have too, and it sucks.

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Why #Rest and #Relaxation Are Like Air to #Writers (and Everyone Else in the World)

Taking care of our physical and mental well-being is an essential piece of our writing progress.

Melanie V. Logan

Rest and relaxation are things that we know we need, but sometimes “life” takes hold and we have to put it off.  For writers, this can be further complicated with extra work hours, kid’s activities, and to-do lists that interfere with our writing time.  So fitting in relaxation is like parallel parking in the tightest space.  Both can be done, but could be difficult without effort and determination (and maybe a stroke of luck).

Mental Health America and Psychology Today emphasize the importance of rest and relaxation on the mind and body.  When the brain’s maxed out, it affects cognition which is the mental ability to understand and process information. From a physical standpoint, when the body’s worn the amount of energy to complete tasks is limited or near non-existent.  If a writer can’t think

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How To Pinpoint Your #Strengths As A #Writer (And Make The Most Of Them!)

redux

Melanie V. Logan

As a writer, you’re constantly honing your craft—reading widely, seeking feedback, and considering the constructive criticism of others. Part of this process is learning how to recognize your own writing strengths. But it’s not always easy to judge yourself objectively, so Writer’s Relief has put together five ways to recognize the areas in which you truly shine:

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Facing rejection from Agents: Remember No means No!

Confessions of a published author

I was ready to submit and had researched various literary agency websites. My covering letter, synopsis and manuscript were polished and ready to go. I felt a sense of euphoria when I actually posted that A4 envelope off or clicked ‘send’ on the messages I sent. There was nothing to do but wait for the positive replies to come in!

Unfortunately it didn’t turn out that way. You see rejection may be presented in many different forms, but they all the mean the same thing: No means No!

Let me run you through the different forms of literary rejection. Please note that these are actual replies and not ones I’ve made up.

I can’t be bothered replying to you ‘No’:

This is where the agent doesn’t even bother getting back to you. They may have read your work or may not have. For all you know there is…

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photo: Caro Wallis Sweet Sorrow via photopin (license)

From Slush Pile to #Editor’s Desk: Build Urgency From the Beginning

Ever hear the saying “you’ll never get a second chance to make a first impression“?  This age-old advice applies to just about anything – books included.  So to hook the reader, the opening has to be attention-grabbing, and the momentum of interest should continue throughout the story.

In part two of Manuela Williams’ series From Slush Pile to Editor’s Desk, an editor’s perspective on building urgency is given.

Manuela Williams

While you can’t predict exactly what an editor will or will not like, there are a couple things you can do to ensure that your story has a fighting chance when you submit it to a literary magazine (and won’t cause anyone to scream and/or tear their hair out in frustration).

This is PART 2 of a multi-post series. For PART 1, click here.

Build Urgency From The Beginning

Lack of urgency is the number one reason why I turn down stories. The prose might be beautiful, but I can’t be sold on that alone. Your story needs to open with a bang and keep me hooked from sentence one.

If your story starts out with two characters discussing the weather, then I probably won’t read on (unless they’re talking about sharknados). Another pet peeve of mine: when a story starts off with a description of scenery. While this can…

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From Slush Pile to #Editor’s Desk: Submit A Story That Stands Out

In part one of Manuela Williams’ series From Slush Pile to Editor’s Desk, an editor provides helpful observations to make our stories unique.

Manuela Williams

Let’s say you’re the editor of a literary magazine. You have ten submissions to review before lunch, a looming press deadline and, on top of everything else, a full time job. What kind of stories do you want to read? The ones with typos, poor formatting, and a nonexistent plot? Or the ones with a compelling beginning, memorable characters, and prose that shines?

Simply put, editors are busy people. From managing the business side of their magazines to reviewing submissions, they have a lot on their plates. As a writer, your job is to make the editor forget about everything but your story.

While you can’t predict exactly what an editor will or will not like, there are a couple things you can do to ensure that your story has a fighting chance when you submit to a literary magazine (and won’t cause anyone to scream and/or tear their hair…

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