#AuthorToolboxBlogHop: monthly hop for #authors who want to learn more about being authors

One can never know too much when it comes to writing.  That’s why resources like the Author Toolbox Blog Hop are essential.  It gives writers a way to learn, share experiences, provide support, and bounce ideas off each other.  Information on how to sign-up for the hop is below.

Raimey Gallant

Author Toolbox Blog Hop: A monthly blog hop for authors who want to learn more about being authors. All authors at all stages of their careers are welcome to join. #AuthorToolboxBlogHop #amwriting

The #AuthorToolboxBlogHop is a monthly event on the topic of resources and learning for authors. Feel free to hop around to the various blogs and see what you learn! The rules and sign-up form are below the list of hop participants. All authors at all stages of their careers are welcome to join.

The Rules:
1. Theme:This is a monthly blog hop on the theme of resources/learning for authors: posts related to the craft of writing, editing, querying, marketing, publishing, blogging tips for authors, reviews of author-related products, anything that an author would find helpful. Sharing of your experiences as it relates to these topics is encouraged but straight journaling with no take away for authors is not what this hop is about. Can you post genre-specific content? Absolutely. You have an idea for a post that doesn’t fit the parameters I’ve outlined, but you feel in your heart…

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The 4 Ps of marketing for #authors (#IWSG Blog Hop)

After months (and sometimes years) of hard work, an author may be ready to take his novel to the next level.  That’s where marketing to the masses comes into play.  But any old type of marketing just won’t do.  It has to be properly considered and planned.  That’s where Raimey Gallant’s post comes in handy –  the 4 Ps every author should use when marketing his/her prose.

Raimey Gallant

The 4 Ps of Marketing for Authors

I’m dating myself, but I used to want to have Angela Bower’s job. For those of you who are unfamiliar, Angela was a character on a show co-starring a very young Alyssa Milano. For those who are familiar, Angela was the boss, am I right? And Angela was an advertising guru. Then I grew up and majored in marketing, and my dream was shattered. (Well, one of them. I also wanted to be Nancy Drew, Indiana Jones, and Jessica Fletcher. Still working toward that last one.) Back to the day I learned that there was no longer a market for Advertising Specialists, and that advertising is just one small piece of the puzzle. What puzzle, you ask? It’s actually more of a pie chart, and it’s called the ‘4 Ps of Marketing,’ or the ‘Marketing Mix.’ Below, I explain how each piece of this puzzle forms the holistic view of…

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Community Writing: #Critique Thy Neighbour

At the moment, I am actively involved in one critique group.  We call ourselves the Book Markers. Clever, huh?  🙂

It’s easy to write in a bubble where everything we write sounds good.  As Nthato mentioned, being a part of a group helps to vet story ideas, receive beneficial feedback, and build a supportive network with other writers.  These are essentials for good writing and helping to stay motivated.

 

A-Scribe To Describe

writing-group

I’m part of a writer’s group. Several in fact,  although I’m far more active in the more social group than the others and that’s just because it’s more convenient for me. The great thing about writing groups is being able to share writing and let others give insight as to what you wrote. A lot of times we talk through ideas, explain what an official sending address looks like, what sites are perfect for getting people’s names, and occasional debates about Twilight, Fifty Shades, and other heated topics. *I may have played the devil’s advocate on a number of occasions.

However, most importantly, we encourage each other to write. This include adding short excerpts and asking for feedback, because as a writer, feedback is important. Rachel Poli wrote a blog post some time ago about exchanging stories with her sister Kris, and how they critique each others work. It’s a…

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5 Reasons Why I Love The #Emotions Thesaurus

The Emotions Thesaurus has been the greatest tool in my arsenal.  Sometimes I know what emotion to write about, but have a hard time illustrating the body language. I rummage through my head for situations where I felt like the character, but the past actions I used escapes me. This handy book takes the stress out of guessing and remembering. 

It’s definitely helpful with showing instead of telling. The only thing I wish could be different is for new editions with added emotions such as grief. 

Paving My Author's Road

5-reasons-why-i-love-the-emotions-thesaurus

I didn’t get to do this kind of post, a review of sorts about writing guides/books. I’d planned to last year but better late than never, right? Besides, it’s long overdue to shout from the mountain tops how much I love The Emotions Thesaurus.

How much do I love it?

Well to quote Elizabeth Barrett Browning, ‘let me count the ways!’

I love how it reminds the writer all the ways a character can speak without the use of their mouth. When I got back into the writing game after a long detour, I admit my characters were one dimensional. They spoke but they rarely moved on the page. Literally and figuratively. And then I purchased this wonderful book and my eyes were re-opened. I remembered that body language too spoke volumes.

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5 Great Online Resources for #Writers: Guest Post by Isa Cox

Great list!  I’ve heard of Goodreads and TED Talks, but not the others.  I will definitely check them out. Thanks for the tip.

Nicholas C. Rossis

Image courtesy of Fredrik Rubensson under CC BY-SA 2.0 Image courtesy of Fredrik Rubensson under CC BY-SA 2.0

When it comes to making it as a writer, there are no hard and fast rules, it seems. For writers who have spent the better part of their lives receiving rejection letters, there’s always the J.K. Rowling story. For the die-hard traditionalists who say you need a publisher, you can always throw E.L. James at them. All in all, what the writing world has taught us in terms of popularity is that anything goes.

So to build up on the kind of characteristics that make writers stand out from the pack, check out these great resources for pursuing the writer dream. From indie publishing tips to great seminars on storytelling, there’s a plethora of information to bring your next novel straight to the New York Times Bestseller list—or on the shortlist for a Pulitzer, whatever floats your boat.

  1. The Paris Review

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The Benefits of Handwriting vs. Typing: Why the Pen May Be Mightier Than the Keyboard

As I’ve mentioned in past posts, I LOVE infographics.  They offer a quick snippet of information in a visually pleasant manner.  So imagine my awe and delight when I ran across the one below.

Personally, I have noticed more fluidity of ideas when using my tablet and stylus to write compared to my laptop. Continue reading “The Benefits of Handwriting vs. Typing: Why the Pen May Be Mightier Than the Keyboard”

Favorite Places, Creative Spaces

Image: They Yocum Library
Image: They Yocum Library

Not long ago I mentioned that I was having a bit of writer’s block. After a moment of reflection, I realized that there’s just a lot going on in my life right now professionally and personally.  Time and creative energy to write have been on low supply….until now.

I ran across a blog that offered some direction to at least keep me writing. Tiana Lopez’s blog, Zealous Scripts, has a section dedicated to writing prompts. I thought I’d take a stab at a few of them – at least get a paragraph or two out. So, for the next few weeks, I’ll post some of my content based on these. Happy reading!  Continue reading “Favorite Places, Creative Spaces”